Tag Archives: Clickers

Finding passion

I’m finally through one of the busiest three months I think I’ve ever spent in this business, so hopefully I can get around to more regular posting here. The last big thing that I did as part of this busy stretch also happened to be one of the coolest things I’ve done in a while: I got to do a clicker workshop for some of the senior staff of the Johnson County Humane Society.

It turns out that someone had donated a set of 50 TurningPoint RF cards and a receiver to the Humane Society for use in educational programming — but nobody at the Humane Society knew how to use them or had any idea what they could do with them. One of the leaders in the Humane Society saw an email announcing a workshop I was doing on campus and contacted me about training. We had a great workshop last Friday and came up with some very cool ideas for using clickers in the elementary schools to teach kids about proper care of animals, in training new volunteers at the animal shelter in identifying animal breeds and diseases, even in board meetings.

The thing that stuck with me the most, though, about the folks from the Humane Society was their authentic passion for what they do. They really care about their work with the Humane Society and want to think of new and creative ways to express and share it with others.

This got me thinking: How can you tell what a person or small group of people are passionate about? It seems to me that there’s a two-step process:

  1. Give those people a break and let them do whatever they want. Remove all the programming you have planned for them, just for a little bit. And then:
  2. See what it is they talk about when there is no structure.

Whatever gets talked about, is what those people are passionate about — at least at the time. If they don’t talk about anything, they aren’t passionate about anything.

For teachers: What does this observation, assuming it’s not totally off-base, say about how we conduct our teaching? It seems to me that we fill the spaces that our students have with all kinds of programming — more topics, more homework, more of everything — until there is no space left to fill, and then when there is time to discuss anything students want, they’d rather stay silent. The passion has been beaten out of them. Might students benefit from a little more space, a little more time to play, and a lot less time trying to get to the next topic or the next example or prepare for the next test?

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Filed under Clickers, Education, Life in academia, Peer instruction, Teaching

Technology FAIL day

This morning as I was driving in to work, I got to thinking: Could I teach my courses without all the technology I use? As in, just me, my students, and a chalk/whiteboard with chalk/markers? As I pulled in to the college, I thought: Sure I could. It just wouldn’t be as good or fun without the tech.

Little did I know, today would be centered around living that theory out:

  • I planned a Keynote presentation with clicker questions to teach the section on antiderivatives in Calculus. As soon as I tried to get the clickers going, I realized the little USB receiver wasn’t working. Turns out, updating Mac OS X to v10.6.5 breaks the software that runs the receiver. Clicker questions for this morning: Out the window. Hopefully I’ll find a useable laptop for tomorrow, when I’m using even more clicker questions.
  • Also in calculus, the laptop inexplicably went into presenter mode when I tried to give the presentation without clicker questions. Most of the time when I try to get it into presenter mode, I can’t do it. This time I couldn’t make it stop.
  • The Twitter client on my laptop got stuck in some kind of strange mode such that clicking on anything made it go to Expose.
  • I lost the network connection to our department printer halfway through the day.
  • GMail went down.

Fortunately everything I had planned could be done without any technology aside from the whiteboard. But when the technology doesn’t work, I have to improvise, and sometimes that works well and sometimes not. In calculus, I just had to revert back to what is often called the “interactive lecture”, which means just a regular lecture where you hope the students ask questions, and it was about as engaging as that sounds.

I do believe I can teach without all this technology, but the kind of teaching I do with the technology is, I think, more inherently engaging and meaningful for students. I ask better questions, interact more freely with students, and highlight the coherence and the big ideas of the material more adeptly with the technology in place. So when the tech fails on me, things seem odd and out of place and contrived. Students pick up on that. Maybe I’m simply addicted to the tech, but I don’t like teaching without it, and my classes aren’t nearly at the same level without it.

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Filed under Educational technology, Life in academia, Math, Profhacks, Teaching, Technology

The case of the curious boxplots

I just graded my second hour-long assessment for the Calculus class (yes, I do teach other courses besides MATLAB). I break these assessments up into three sections: Concept Knowledge, where students have to reason from verbal, graphical, or numerical information (24/100 points); Computations, where students do basic context-free symbol-crunching (26/100 points); and Problem Solving, consisting of problems that combine conceptual knowledge and computation (50/100 points). Here’s the Assessment itself. (There was a problem with the very last item — the function doesn’t have an inflection point — but we fixed it and students got extra time because of it.)

Unfortunately the students as a whole did quite poorly. The class average was around a 51%. As has been my practice this semester, I turn to data analysis whenever things go really badly to try and find out what might have happened. I made boxplots for each of the three sections and for the overall scores. The red bars inside the boxplots are the averages for each.

I think there’s some very interesting information in here.

The first thing I noticed was how similar the Calculations and Problem Solving distributions were. Typically students will do significantly better on Calculations than anything else, and the Problem Solving and Concept Knowledge distributions will mirror each other. But this time Calculations and Problem Solving appear to be the same.

But then you ask: Where’s the median in boxplots for these two distributions? The median shows up nicely in the first and fourth plot, but doesn’t appear in the middle two. Well, it turns out that for Calculations, the median and the 75th percentile are equal; while for Problem Solving, the median and the 25th percentile are equal! The middle half of each distribution is between 40 and 65% on each section, but the Calculation middle half is totally top-heavy while the Problem Solving middle half is totally bottom-heavy. Shocking — I guess.

So, clearly conceptual knowledge in general — the ability to reason and draw conclusions from non-computational methods — is a huge concern. That over 75% of the class is scoring less than 60% on a fairly routine conceptual problem is unacceptable. Issues with conceptual knowledge carry over to problem solving. Notice that the average on Conceptual Knowledge is roughly equal to the median on Problem Solving. And problem solving is the main purpose of having students take the course in the first place.

Computation was not as much of an issue for these students because they get tons of repetition with it (although it looks like they could use some more) via WeBWorK problems, which are overwhelmingly oriented towards context-free algebraic calculations. But what kind of repetition and supervised practice do they get with conceptual problems? We do a lot of group work, but it’s not graded. There is still a considerable amount of lecturing going on during the class period as well, and there is not an expectation that when I throw out a conceptual question to the class that it is supposed to be answered by everybody. Students do not spend nearly as much time working on conceptual problems and longer-form contextual problems as they do basic, context-free computation problems.

This has got to change in the class, both for right now — so I don’t end up failing 2/3 of my class — and for the future, so the next class will be better equipped to do calculus taught at a college level. I’m talking with the students tomorrow about the short term. As for the long term, two things come to mind that can help.

  • Clickers. Derek Bruff mentioned this in a Twitter conversation, and I think he’s right — clickers can elicit serious work on conceptual questions and alert me to how students are doing with these kinds of questions before the assessment hits and it’s too late to do anything proactive about it. I’ve been meaning to take the plunge and start using clickers and this might be the right, um, stimulus for it.
  • Inverted classroom. I’m so enthusiastic about how well the inverted classroom model has worked in the MATLAB course that I find myself projecting that model onto everything. But I do think that this model would provide students with the repetition and accountability they need on conceptual work, as well as give me the information about how they’re doing that I need. Set up some podcasts for course lectures for students to listen/watch outside of class; assign WeBWorK to assess the routine computational problems (which would be no change from what we’re doing now); and spend every class doing a graded in-class activity on a conceptual or problem-solving activity. That would take some work and a considerable amount of sales pitching to get students to buy into it, but I think I like what it might become.

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Filed under Calculus, Clickers, Critical thinking, Inverted classroom, Math, Teaching, Technology